AUDIENCES HATE CLASSICAL MUSIC BECAUSE THEIR BRAINS CANNOT COPE WITH IT – Science research finding by Richard Grey.

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The Muson Symphony Orchestra in Concert with Ace Pianist, Tunde Sosan

Classical music is so widely disliked by audiences because the human brain struggles to find patterns it needs to understand the compositions as music.

For decades critics of classical music have been derided as philistines for failing to grasp the subtleties of the chaotic sounding compositions, but there may now be an explanation for why many audiences find them so difficult to listen to.
A new book on how the human brain interprets music has revealed that listeners rely upon finding patterns within the sounds they receive in order to make sense of it and interpret it as a musical composition.

While traditional classical music follows strict patterns and formula that allow the brain to make sense of the sound, modern symphonies by composers such as Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern simply confuse listeners’ brains.

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Nigerian Soprano Diva, Agatha Ibeazor in performance

Philip Ball, author of The Music Instinct, has drawn on the latest scientific findings from neuroscientists to show structure and patterns in music are a fundamental part of musical enjoyment.

He said: “Many people still seem to find classical music challenging. If that is the case, then they can relax as it is challenging for a good reason and it is not because they are in some way too musically stupid to appreciate it.

“The brain is a pattern seeking organ, so it looks for patterns in music to make sense of what we hear. The music of Bach, for example, embodies a lot of the pattern forming process.

“Some of the things that were done by those composers such as Schoenberg undermined this cognitive aid for making music easier to understand and follow. Schoenberg’s music became fragmented which makes it harder for the brain to find structure.

“That isn’t to say, of course, that it is impossible to listen to, it is just harder work. It would be wrong to dismiss such music as a racket.”

Mr Ball believes that many traditional composers such as Mozart, Bach and Beethoven subconsciously followed strict musical formula to produce music that was easy on the ear by ensuring it contained patterns that could be picked out by the brain.

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Rave of the moment Tenor Singer Joseph Oparamanuike in Performance with Italian Soprano, Rosaria Buscemi

In the early twentieth century, however, composers led by Schoenberg began to rally against the traditional conventions of music to produce compositions which lack tonal centres, known as atonal music.

Under their vision, which has been adopted by many subsequent classical musicians, music no longer needed to be confined to a home note or chord.

But such atonal music has been badly received by audiences and critics who have found it difficult to follow.

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Tunde Jegede on the Kora, in performance with the Muson Symphony Orchestra

Professor David Huron, an expert on music cognition at Ohio State University, has studied some of the underlying reasons why listeners struggled with such modern classical pieces.

He said: “Much of what the brain does is to anticipate the future. Predicting what happens next has obvious survival value, and brains are remarkably adept at anticipating events.

“We measured the predictability of tone sequences in music by Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern and found the successive pitches were less predictable than random tone sequences.

“For listeners, this means that, every time you try to predict what happens next, you fail. The result is an overwhelming feeling of confusion, and the constant failures to anticipate what will happen next means that there is no pleasure from accurate prediction.”

Dr Aniruddh Patel, a researcher at the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego, California, said that tonal music such as traditional classical music uses some of the same mechanisms needed for processing language.

“This may be one reason such music is congenial to the human mind,” he said. “It may be a reason why atonal music is more difficult when first encountered.”

Dr Timothy Jones, deputy principal at the Royal Academy of Music, said:

“Mozart and Bach have similar levels of complexity as Schoenberg, but those complexities are in different musical domains. Their music is very information dense.

“I would question how much of the familiarity with the music of Mozart and Bach has to do with culturalisation rather than an innate cognitive inability to understand the music of composers like Schoenberg. Certain people can learn to appreciate it.”

Research has shown that listening to music is a major cognitive task that requires considerable processing resources to unpick harmony, rhythm and melody.

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Nigerian Baritone sensation Maurice Obinna Ifediora in performance

Recent studies by Professor Nina Kraus, a neuroscientists at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, have shown that the electrical activity inside the brain while listening to music closely matches the physical properties of sound waves.

Using brain scanning equipment Professor Kraus, who presented her findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Diego on Saturday, said the brainwaves recorded from volunteers listening to music could be converted back to sound.

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Joseph, flanked by Obinna in a performance of Mozart’s Requiem

In one example where volunteers listened to Deep Purple’s Smoke on the Water, when the brainwaves were played back the song was clearly recognisable.

She said:
“When we play the brainwaves back as sound, although they don’t sound exactly like the song, it is pretty similar. It shows that the brain matches the physical properties of sound very closely.”

Very good finding by Richard Grey.
This is one reason it’s takes years of rigorous studies by a Classical Musician to master the art. It is indeed the most difficult genre of music to understand, talk less of Performing.

For this reason, I have taken it upon myself to be a Vocal Teacher in this generation. I desire to teach the right techniques of singing. Imagine singing wrongly with an already difficult genre, your voice would be heading for destruction. Armed with the right techniques, you’ll sing into your 80’s.

When next you see a Classical Musician, know that you’re talking to  a hard working man, it’s not an easy genre

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

30 Adenrele Street,
Egbeda Akowonjo,
Lagos, Nigeria.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Andrew Egbuchiem

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Andrew Egbuchiem

There are counter tenors and there are COUNTER TENORS!!
The name Andrew Egbuchiem will not sound new to anyone who has come a long way in the Nigerian Classical Music scene, as he remains the most reliable Counter Tenor of all times. A veteran in the game, the writer is yet to hear a better Nigerian Counter Tenor Voice.

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As a child, Andrew recounts that singing was all he wanted to do, the passion made him join his church choir in Festac Town Lagos as a Treble.
He was the only male in the soprano section. He later auditioned to sing soprano in 2001 at the Muson Festival, but the Choral Director, Mr Nwokedi wouldn’t allow it. He was immediately converted to an Alto Singer. Andrew became a star instantly in the Alto part, as he went on to take Alto Solos in different Oratorios and other choral works. Few years down the line, the name Andrew became a house hold name with such a sonorous Counter Tenor Voice. A delight to every listener.

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Andrew practicing with an Oud player

In a chat, the passionate Andrew talks about the lack of passion in the scene in recent years.

“Lack of passion is my turn off. Most Classical Musicians, especially the young ones, don’t have a genuine passion for Classical Music. Lack of in depth research on how to improve their art makes me sick and biggest of them all is too much focus on money. 
My turn on is, a few passionate ones are making real name for themselves and it makes me really happy”

A native of Illah in Delta State Nigeria, Andrew Chukwuka Egbuchiem is the first son of a family of fantastic singers. Two of his brothers Callis and Justus are very fine Tenor Singers.

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He studied Music at the Adeniran Ogunsanya college of Education, ijanikin, where he majored in Music Education, with emphasis on the Voice.

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Andrew in a Native Costume representing Nigeria in New York, USA

Andrew is the Director of The Nigerian Philharmonics Company/The Philharmonics Company Nigeria. He is currently signed unto Schola Cantorum in Hudson New Jersey where he performs regularly.

Put your hands together for this Conductor, Performer, Vocal Instructor and Music Teacher Andrew Egbuchiem

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY.

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

30 Adenrele Street,
Egbeda Akowonjo,
Lagos, Nigeria.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Ayodele Omole

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Ayodele Omole

In 1988 he was the youngest member of the Boy’s brigade mass band at the 80th National Camp in Jos. Fast forward to 1998, he became a band leader at the 90th edition in Umuahia and one of the band directors at the centenary celebration in 2008.

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Ayo, Band Director, Anglican Communion Boy’s Brigade

The artiste of this week, Ayodele Omole is a multi instrumentalist, and a musician of great repute.
Born into the Musical Family of a foremost Music Educator in Lagos, Mr. Ebenezer Omole, young Ayo was not interested in Music initially. However, his father as a Music Teacher wanted him to have a basic knowledge of Music. Surprisingly, it grew into passion and Ayo decided to follow it through.

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He then Joined  the church choir and boys Brigade and would later proceed to study music under his father’s tutelage at the Classique School of Music, owned by him. Whilst in Igbobi College Yaba, Music was also a core part of the school’s curriculum and so he also enjoyed learning music in secondary school.
The older Ayo grew, the hungrier he became for more knowledge in Music. He enrolled at the Muson Basic School where he studied Theory and Practicals and also passed graded exams in flying colours. He then moved on to higher Institutions of learning at the Lagos State University and the University of Ado Ekiti where he bagged certificates in Music.

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Ayo playing in a summer class abroad

At the Classique school of Music and also at the Boy’s Brigade, Ayo learnt how to play horns. Today, he has mastered the Brass instrument having acquired a distinctive tone and technique.

With Mr. Ebenezer Omole controlling the affairs Musically at home, and for Ayo and two of his siblings, Music was more like a way of life, they would practically infuse Music into their daily dealings. It was part of everyone in the family.
His younger brother plays all Brass Instruments, Woodwinds and Piano. The last of them all, his younger sister, plays the Piano and Violin.

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Ayo on the Tenor Saxophone and Organ

Ayo recounts that they had Music education on a platter of Gold, as his father was ready to travel the whole world in search of music materials and instruments for their training.

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He holds several certificates in Music from Muson, Trinity college of Music and ABRSM London, up to grade 8 level. His hunger for knowledge grows the more by the day, as he constantly attends conferences and short term courses yearly, to upgrade himself.
He also holds a Diploma in Music from the Lagos State University, LASU and a Bachelor of Arts (Education) degree from the University of Ado Ekiti.

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Ayo in a various conferences in Europe, test-playing horns.

Ayo Omole is the Director of Music at St Paul’s Anglican Church, Idi-Oro, Lagos,
Captain, Boy’s Brigade of St Paul’s Anglican Church, Idi-Oro, Lagos,
Band Director, Anglican Communion Boy’s Brigade,
Head of Music, Lagos State Boy’s Brigade, and
Music Director, St. Saviours School, Ikoyi, Lagos.

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One of his numerous female students playing the Trumpet

Ayo plays the Tenor and Alto Saxophone, Horns, Piano and Organ.

Please put your hands together for this Conductor, Music Teacher, Music Director and Multi Instrumentalist; Ayodele Omole.

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY!

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

30 Adenrele Street,
Egbeda Akowonjo,
Lagos, Nigeria.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

OGA! PAY ME MY MONEY

GREED;

THE CANKERWORM AMONG CLASSICAL MUSICIANS.

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The festive season may have come and gone, but for many, the memories will linger in their hearts for a long time.
For some musicians, the memories bring a very large doze of anger and bitterness towards “Oga” who over worked them during the festive season only to pay them peanuts.

Today, I’m not writing to celebrate a Classical Musician like I always do, but to discuss a growing concern that will affect some, if not all great Classical Musicians in the society. If you are part of those who cheat their subordinates, count your teeth with your tongue and let your conscience judge you. Na Money Matter!

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FELLOW MUSICIANS
My attention has been drawn to the growing trend of greed and covetousness that abounds amongst us.

For some years, I have sat and watched our senior colleagues (Oga) cheat us year in, year out. How does it feel as an Oga, that your children attend the best schools, wear the best clothes, drive the best cars and can afford the beautiful things of life, while that Singer in your band/Choir cannot afford to buy a N3,000 shirt without feeling the pains when he hears his phone ring with the Alert of his current balance.

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These people exploit young musicians, they take you to a show where they are paid 5 million, and they give the Band/Choir members N5,000 each, that is smart robbery without a gun.

A senior colleague once argued with me for paying my Orchestra Members N30,000 each. He said I should have paid them N10,000 each,  after all, “na me bring the show”. But NO! my conscience wouldn’t allow me, even when the guys didn’t know what I discussed with my clients in terms of their honorarium because they trust me. I couldn’t pay them lesser than they ought to have gotten, just because they had no idea of my agreement with the clients.
I couldn’t bear the feeling of smiling with them, having cheated them behind.

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For instance, how can you go for a show where you’re paid N10,000,000,000 (10 Million Naira) and you pay your musicians N30,000 each? Would it hurt if you pay them N100,000 each?
I’m sure you’ll still have at least N8,000,000,000 which is still big money.

A young musician came crying to me last December. He played in over 6 shows all through the Christmas season and in the process, he broke his instrument in one occasion, as he tried to transport it to the venue and all he got from Oga was N25,000. Come on????  For 6 shows?
Oga must have gotten at least 3 to 4 million Naira per show. Would it hurt to pay N30,000 per show? In my opinion, Big NO!

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Now these young, fantastic and vibrant musicians have nothing but negative feelings towards these “Ogas”. I have sat with them several times, all they ever do is reign curses on Oga for cheating them, you’ll never hear them say anything good about their Oga. As much as I really don’t like it when they reign those heavy curses, what can I do? they even grow angrier when I try to stop them.

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An African proverb says “A good name is worth more than Money” If Oga knows this, I’m sure he’ll not cheat on young musicians, clearly they need these guys to make great music. No Oga in this Music game can do it alone.

Some see their phones ring, and refuse to pick it, they are tired of working with Oga, because they can already tell before hand, that nothing good will come out of the show.

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For how long?
How long will you continue to cheat your musicians?
For how long will you continue to rob your subordinates of their hard work?
That money will only bring you pain and sorrow, the repercussions are usually grave. You might not see it now, but consequences will follow soon.

For this reason, I have decided to be on my own, I have decided to chase a solo career. I will work for myself and earn my own money, rather than help another man build mansions, buy the latest cars and become a Trilionaire. It’s just that the Big Men in the society will not help you when you go to them to sponsor your show, they prefer to give large sum of money to Oga, than give to you who is upcoming and trying to be like Oga, in the game. So tell me, how can Omo Ise grow? Not to forget that so many Omo Ise(s) are prolific at what they do. To say the truth, this game belongs to the youth, young minds rule in this game now.  Check it out, the best Pianists, Violinists, Trumpeters, Singers etc, are young people. It’ll be very difficult for Oga to hold a show without Omo Ise, so why use him and pay him chicken feed?

I hold no grudges against any particular person, neither do I have anyone in mind as I write, with all due respect. Oga remains Oga, but I seize to be a member of any group or Choir/Band/Ensemble.

The one man mopol na him favour me pass. If you cannot afford me, no problem, call the rookie who would accept the peanut. Like I always say; “life is like an Express road and overtaking is allowed, if you get there before me, CONGRATULATIONS” I’m in no competition with any one. A Yoruba proverb says “aye po gan”.  

One thing is of the essence;

Let there be a turning point in your life this year Mr Oga! Yes, You! I am talking to You, reading this Now!
Pay your subordinates what they worked for, stop cheating people, in the name of “na me bring the show”

Above all, give your life to Jesus, and live a life that is just, with truth and fairness. He is the only one who can save you from such a fast lane to Hell.
“For what shall it profit a man, to gain the whole world, by cheating his fellow musician, and loose his soul”……
Think about it.

A WORD IS ENOUGH FOR OGA!! 

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I have spoken!
I will write again.

HAPPY NEW YEAR.

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

30 Adenrele Street,
Egbeda Akowonjo,
Lagos, Nigeria.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Julius Nglass

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Julius Nglass

He made headlines in Nigeria as the first Classical Singer of this generation to perform before a mammoth crowd at the Experience 2015, organized by House on The Rock Church. A prayer made by every Nigerian Classical Singer who is only confined to performing at small gatherings, Churches, and small concert halls.
It is note worthy to state that, performing before a massive crowd of 700,000 people is a big achievement any Classical Singer can ever attain and for this, I am particularly happy.

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A fraction of the crowd at the Experience 2015

It is an achievement to be joyful about and that’s because soon enough, some other singer will get another nod and then another singer to the other etc.

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Julius flagged by Nathaniel Bassey, Don Moen, Donnie McClurkin, Micah Stampley, Sammy Okposo and a host of other stars.

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Julius performing on the night

A native of Ama-Nglass in Eastern Obolo LGA in Akwa Ibom State, Julius Nglass who happens to be the son of a very popular Anglican Clergyman (Archbishop) – The Most Reverend Emmanuel Nglass, it was only natural for the every child to be in the choir or church band. That training paid off for the Nglass boys as everyone in the family is highly gifted musically. The best form of musical foundation any parent can give a child, you would say.

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The proud father, The Most Revd. Emmanuel Nglass and the gifted Nglass boys

Admitting that the acceptance of Classical Music in Nigeria is very low, Julius agrees that the Nigerian Classical Singer must re-invent themselves to be more marketable, taking a cue from the Hip-Hop musicians whom according to him took a decisive decision that brought about the acceptance of what ever they do today.

“We must carry ourselves with the poise and charisma suitable for what we do. A lot of us give the people the impression that what we do is common”

He called for Classical Musicians to begin to compose and perform songs that the Nigerian audience can relate to.

An Organ business man trained in the Netherlands, Julius represents the Content Classical Organs, also made in the Netherlands. He is a dealer, technician and builder.

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He also plays the Violin, Drums, Piano and Organ.
He is the Assistant Organist at the church of Nativity, Ikoyi, Lagos.

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Please put your hands together for the Experience Man, an Organist, Pianist, Violinist and Organ Business Man

Julius Nglass

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY.

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

Musical Society of Nigeria
8/9 Marina, Onikan Lagos.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Alaba Akinselure

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Alaba Akinselure

Alaba Akinselure for me, is the most patient accompanist I have ever worked with. Not like the rest are not patient, but Alaba allows the Singer dictate and call the shots as he relegates himself to the very background. A difficult trait to find in accompanists in this part of the world.

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The Ondo man has also been relevant to Classical Singers with some of his melodious compositions which include “Mura Si Ise”. It is always a pleasure to sing that piece, although I wonder why Nigerian Composers of this age have forgotten that Baritones exist, abeg composers, make una consider us naa, haba!. Alaba also has other compositions for Organ, Choir and Instruments.

Alaba Akinselure started his music career as a boy in the Christ Apostolic Church (CAC) Owodunni, Palmgroove, Lagos in the early 90’s as the quest for knowledge made him join the church choir. He later began to learn Piano Playing under Pastor Ebenezer Olaniyi. As the knowledge grew, Alaba’s hunger for music grew bigger, pushing him enrol at the Pa Fayemi school of music in Ilupeju, Lagos, in the mid 90’s.

In 2001, he met with Mr Segun Fadeyi, who convinced him to take his music studies a notch higher, after listening to him play some choruses from Handel’s Messiah. Mr. Fadeyi encouraged him to enrol for the Lagos State University Diploma program in 2002.

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Studying Music at The Lagos State University is an an experience Alaba cannot forget in a hurry, here he recounts the state of Nigerian Choral Music and Music Education, even as he applauds Nigerian Classical Musicians both graduates and undergraduates alike.

“The quality of teaching before was deplorable, but I’m happy it has improved in recent times. I’m also very happy that things are changing in Music Education generally in Nigeria. We now have young people who are passionate about the profession, students who are now performance driven and not those who are theorists. The advent of institutions like Muson School of Music helped in this regard. Choral music is growing in Nigeria. The participation of some Nigerian Chorale groups in international competition, has put Nigerian Choral music on the world Map. Composers are now writing music for different mediums.
Focusing on our indigenous choral music will make choral music gain more acceptance in Nigeria and the infusion of our indigenous musical instruments will enhance good performance. Choral music can be very lucrative if it is well packaged
The future is bright for choral music”

Alaba Akinselure holds a B.A in Majoring   in Conducting, Piano and Organ performance at the Lagos state University. He also holds a Masters Degree in Composition and Performance from The University of Lagos.

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Alaba has featured at World Choir Games and European Choir games in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA in 2012 and Graz, Austria, in 2013, accompanying the Lagos City Chorale respectively.
He has also performed at an event in Dubai in 2014.

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Alaba and representatives from other countries at the European Choir Games, Graz, Austria.

He has been an Organist at St Stephen’s Anglican Church, Igbobi and currently the Organist and Choirmaster at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Surulere, Lagos. He owns a contemporary band which performs a blend of highlife and juju.

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Alaba and some of his Choristers at the Holy Trinity Anglican Church.

Please put your hands together for this Pianist, Organist, Composer, Teacher and Performer;

Alaba Akinselure

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY!

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

Musical Society of Nigeria
8/9 Marina, Onikan Lagos.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Godwin Sadoh

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Godwin Sadoh

Growing up as a Kid in Mushin Lagos, Eko Boys High School which was close to my house was known for being notorious. If you had an issue with a student of Eko Boys High, then count yourself doomed. Schools close by were scared of having issues with them, they were a handful.
I am expressing my shock this morning because the artiste of this week went to Eko Boys, and at that time the school had a very good Music Background, that set the tone for him and today, he is a Professor of Music starting out from the same school that we once feared.

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Prof. Godwin Sadoh

Professor Godwin Sadoh was born in Lagos and had his formative days in music at the Eko Boys’ High School, Lagos, where he was subsequently appointed to the position of school organist and choirmaster at the tender age of 16. During his tenure, the young Sadoh directed several musical activities at Eko Boys that included a Christmas concert of Nine Lessons and Carols in December 1981. After graduating from Eko Boys, the young Sadoh founded and directed several choral groups such as the Golden Bells Choral, the Ile-Ife Junior Choir, and the Ile-Ife Choral Society. In addition, Sadoh concertized as a solo pianist playing recitals in Kaduna, Abuja, Ile-Ife, Lagos, and at the Maestro Christopher Oyesiku epic concert series at the University of Ibadan.

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Bass Maestro Christopher Oyesiku conducting the choir at the University of Ibadan in 1987, one of the concerts Prof. Sadoh played in

He studied piano, organ, composition, and African music in Nigeria before proceeding to the United States for advance studies in music. His degrees include M.A. in African ethnomusicology from the University of Pittsburgh; M. Mus. in Organ Performance and church music from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; He received the Doctor of Music degree in organ performance and composition from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge;

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The Music Scholar, Prof. Godwin Sadoh

He is the first African to earn a doctoral degree in Organ Performance from any institution in the world. In addition, Sadoh is the first Nigerian to ever earn a terminal degree (D.Mus.) in the field of music performance. All his predecessors, had their Ph.D. degrees in musicology. It is noteworthy that in addition to the rigorous academic program at LSU, Prof. Sadoh published 25 scholarly articles during his graduate studies at that institution.

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His extensive research on African ethnomusicology, intercultural musicology, modern African art music, Nigerian church music, organ building, and composers, is published in reputable international journals in America, Canada, Europe, and the Middle-East. One of his books, Intercultural Dimensions in Ayo Bankole’s Music, topped the bestseller list as No. 1 on Amazon in 2007. Prof. Sadoh’s books have been catalogued in some of the most prestigious archival centers and university libraries around the world, including the Library of Congress–Washington DC, Smithsonian Libraries–Washington DC, Harvard University Library, Yale University Library, Columbia University–New York, Cornell University–New York, Dartmouth College Music Library–New Hampshire, Center for Black Music Research–Chicago, Bayreuth University Library–Germany, and the Music Library of the University of Pretoria–South Africa. Prof. Sadoh has taught at several institutions of higher learning including Kentucky State University, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Professor Sadoh has composed for all the music genres–organ, piano, vocal solo, vocal duet, SATB choral, electronic, chamber, and the orchestra. His music has been performed and recorded in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Poland, Scotland, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. 

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Prof. Sadoh on the Organ

Professor Sadoh is a recipient of the ASCAP PLUS Award for 10 years in a row in recognition of the publications and performances of his compositions worldwide. His biography is listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in American Education, Who’s Who in the World, and the Contemporary African Database. Wayne Leupold Editions, Evensong Music- Media and Graphics, Wehr’s Music House and GSS Publications (All in the United States), are the publishers of his compositions.

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Please raise your glasses for this Ethnomusicologist, Composer, Church Musician, Organist, Pianist, Choral Conductor, and a prolific publishing scholar with over 100 stellar publications including 11 books.

Professor Godwin Sadoh.

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY!

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

Musical Society of Nigeria
8/9 Marina, Onikan Lagos.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Olumide Dada

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Olumide Dada

PETERU!!!!!!! As that Yoruba grandmama would misinterprete his English name. Here is a cool chap, one of Nigeria’s Finest Baritone singers this week on KORALTIMES.

Olumide Dada started out as a Chorister at the Holy Cross Cathedral, Lagos Island. He got his first training from Ms Regina Anajemba who introduced him to professional classical singing. He later moved on to Join Laz Ekwueme Chorale, and there he grew in leaps and bounds singing with great Classical Singers like; Dare Art Alade, Ben Ogbeiwi, Ige and many other talented Classical Vocalists.
In 2006 he started out Professionally, after taking part in the Muson Talent Hunt and emerging as the 1st runner up.

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Olumide in Concert.

According to Olumide, Classical Music has been seen as alien to the Nigerian society, as only the elites enjoy it and also attend concerts. If not for Colonial Influence, no one knows what would have been of the genre in Africa’s most populous Nation. It then becomes difficult for Classical Artistes to make ends meet with the genre. Here Olumide speaks on the Matter;

“Classical Music is not as accepted as pop and all, but it’s coming up, Its for the elite, because its naturally on the low beat, its not club music”

He also talks about the scarcity of quality Baritone Singers in Nigeria;

“For other genres of Music, you don’t have to work hard, and this has influenced young Baritones in Nigeria. They fail to understand that professional singing requires a lot of training.
You have to be very good to be known and heard out there, because Baritone is Low Range, you have to do a lot in concert to impress people. Unlike a soprano, if she just sings one high note, everybody starts clapping. You have to be very good to make it. In as much as it is a small industry, the competition is very high and so, you must be on top of your game at all times”

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Olumide serenading some ladies in a concert, as Don Jazzy watches in amazement.

Olumide also points out a lot of issues that affects the Classical/Opera genre in Nigeria, some of which includes low Payments to Classical Musicians and Lack of qualified Vocal Trainers. In all of it, he stands tall in the business, making ends meet from it. A very brave move you would say.
He has worked with Yinka Davies, and many other Nigerian Pop and Jazz Artistes and has carved a niche for himself.

A Native of Abeokuta in Ogun State, Nigeria, Olumide has been a member of Laz Ekwueme Chorale, Steve Rhodes Voices, Play house voices, Lagos City Chorale and many more.
In 2011, he gained a scholarship by MTN to study Music at the Muson School of Music. He grabbed the opportunity with both hands, in other to be more grounded in his musical ability. He finished from the school, as the Best Vocalist of his set.

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He is also an European Choir Games Medalist, having represented and Won Gold Medals for Nigeria with the Lagos City Chorale at the competition in Magdeburg, Germany earlier this year.

He has taken part in several productions,  like “SARO, The Musical”, playing a Lead role in the show.
Olumide is also an Actor and Voice Over Artiste.

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An astute showman, Olumide wows his audience.

Please put your hands together for this wonderful performer, one of Nigeria’s Finest Baritone singers, Olumide Dada.

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY.

Click on the links below to watch some of Olumide Dada’s performances;

 

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

Musical Society of Nigeria
8/9 Marina, Onikan Lagos.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

CELEBRATING NIGERIAN CLASSICAL MUSIC GREATS – Stephen Olusoji

ARTISTE OF THE WEEK – Stephen Olusoji

This week’s artiste is not the type of Musician you see on stage, neither is he the type that makes the headlines. This is the Musician at the background, the type of Musician that moulds a Musician.

Stephen Oluibukun Olusoji was born in Lagos to a Clergyman. Surrounded by music and musical instruments, the motivation came to take music to the next cadre from the home front.
He started off as a choir boy, In the alto part, later he picked up the recorder under the tutelage of Late Rev.George Sodipo in the early seventies in a gospel church. He got his first musical training from the Late Ropo Odumosu at Baptist Academy, Obanikoro, Lagos, where he also served as the school’s Organist, before proceeding to higher institutions.

A trained Music Teacher, fondly called “The Doctor”!! by his students, Stephen Olusoji holds an NCE in Music Technology from Ibadan Polytechnic. He was taught by well-groomed Teacher-Musicians. He also holds a B.A In Music from the prestigious University of Nigeria Nsukka, M.Ed (Management) L.A.S.U, M.A.(African music) University of Ibadan and PhD (Ethnomusicology) University of Ibadan. No wonder many of his past students testify that Dr. Stephen is a wonder to behold in the classroom.

As an experienced teacher who has trained quiet a number of Musicians, Dr. Stephen thinks highly of the Nigerian Music Student, but does not spare the rod in stating some grey areas in the lives of Upcoming Musicians, in a chat, he says;

“Students come from different musical backgrounds and it will be quite difficult to access their levels of musical achievements without taking into cognizance that Nigerian students are hardworking, ready to take up challenges but impatient to learn the right techniques, rather it’s a tussle to absolutely chase money and certificate (without substance)”.
It is left to be seen if the Nigerian Student will agree to this notion.

On the issue of lack of facilities and good teachers in the various Nigerian Higher Institutions here’s what he had to say;

“It is a serious problem. The entire system must be sanitized from the Instructors/Lecturers. To be employed, Lecturers must be those that can deliver, add value to the system and Mentor our future Musicologists. We are going to have problem in our music studies at the exit of Ekwueme, Vidal, Obidike, Agu, Adekunle, Akpata and Soyannwo from the stage. It is not the number of PhD holders in the system that matters, but what they can deliver. The students on their own should be more focused and shun materialism but strive for excellence – Seek for the knowledge and every other things shall be added unto you – should be their motto”.

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Dr. Stephen Olusoji on his PhD graduation ceremony

Dr. Olusoji further explains that the solutions to the problems facing music education in Nigeria lies in the hands of the Government to provide enough funds to sustain the arts, according to him, art is life. He also believes that Politicization of appointment into lecturing job is another problem killing the system and calls for a review of the curriculum, so as to meet contemporary needs.

Dr. Stephen Olusoji has attended conferences at home and abroad to improve himself in the area of Music education which he holds dear. He also holds a Cambridge certification for Secondary School Music Education. A very good composer, having studied under Meki Nzewi at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Dr. Olusoji has composed several Choral and Sacred works one of which include “Oyigiyigi” and several other Fuji, Highlife and Apala Music by notable Nigerian Musicians, rearranged for the Piano.

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A very vibrant and exciting Dr. Stephen Olusoji in class.

Ladies and gentlemen, a stand in goon ovation for this Teacher, Pianist, Composer and Music Educator;
Dr. Stephen Olusoji

I CELEBRATE YOU TODAY!

Ifediora, Obinna Maurice
(Baritone)

Musical Society of Nigeria
8/9 Marina, Onikan Lagos.
(±234) 708-708-6669
(+234) 706-338-3135

dasuGarboi@yahoo.com
obislim.baritone@yahoo.com

Showcasing the Best of Nigerian Classical Musicians to the World.